Duke Southard

Author, Educator, Lecturer

Jim Vittum-Agent for justice?

Anyone who saw the 20/20 television show would remember the comments from Brad Garrett, the FBI profiler regarding Jim Vittum’s attempts to play an active role in the investigation of the Stacey Burns murder. That show aired in January, 2011. Yes, folks, that was over THREE years ago!

One of the points made by the profiler (and I am paraphrasing here) was that criminals will often try to be an integral part of the investigation so they can be aware of what is going on. My rereading of this section of my notes made me wonder what possible personal gain could Jim Vittum still be realizing by continuing to be so active now, five years after the murder.

The police seem content to play a waiting game as no one to whom I’ve spoken has seen evidence of an active investigation for months, perhaps longer. If this is the case, it would seem to me that the killer would be willing to play the same game as long as it is working. This would mean making himself or herself as inconspicuous as possible. Why would Jim Vittum, or anyone else, (if guilty) choose to stay in the public eye when it would seem prudent to be low-key, if not invisible? If no one is chasing you, why run?

This is just a thought but is it possible that Jim Vittum could see himself as Stacey’s agent for justice as he remains very loquacious about the case, even five years later? Here is my list of candidates so far of people who could step up to be her agent for justice in the order I presented them: the police, Jeff Strelzin, her family, her friends, her killer, Ed Burns.

Perhaps we need to add Jim Vittum to that list.

Please feel free to comment on this and correct me if I’m wrong.

Duke

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I'm Duke Southard, author, educator, and lecturer.

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