Duke Southard

Author, Educator, Lecturer

Crime Lab Supervisor

Today, I played golf with a man who served as a supervisor in a major state police crime lab. Between searching for my errant shots, I asked him about his work and told him some things about the Stacey Burns murder.

He was astounded that so much information has apparently been shared with media, such as the lead interviewer for the 20/20 television show which aired in 2011. Based on the content of that show, including an interview with Brad Garrett, an FBI profiler, details of the crime must have been shared. When I asked Brad Garrett through an e-mail how he knew the nature and extent of the stab wounds that killed Stacey, he said I should ask that question of  ABC network.

According to my golf partner, who has been asked for information from news media, including major television news “magazines” no information about the details of a crime should ever be shared until the case is over and there is no appeal looming on the horizon. Even then, caution should be exercised.

So, here is a question to ponder. Does the New Hampshire State Police Major Crime Unit have rules against releasing information about a crime? Then, a follow-up question: How could Brad Garrett make the observation he did on 20/20, a statement about the “many wounds to the head and throat” of Stacey Burns?

Just wondering . . .

Duke

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I'm Duke Southard, author, educator, and lecturer.

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