Duke Southard

Author, Educator, Lecturer

Murder In a Small Town

This blog deals specifically with my work on the book, Murder in a Small Town: The Tragic Death of Stacey Burns.

Interesting new question

I received these interesting questions via email from a follower of this blog. With permission, I am reprinting them here, leaving out the three names preceding the question about being asked to be on the 20/20 show back in January, 2011. Suffice it say that these three had close relationships with Stacey Burns at the time of her murder. None of the three appeared in that episode of 20/20 so the questions about their appearance (or lack thereof) seem valid.

The second question dealing with the party that Ed Burns attended on that Saturday night of the murder has been… Continue reading

A 02/16/2011 Quote-Stacey Burns

Again, a visit to my “murder book” on the Stacy Burns murder–

From a Granite State News article: February 2, 2011:

“In the Burns case, we have evidence, but not enough to make an arrest and that is what the state police are continuing to build on.”

So, over seven years ago, they had “evidence” but not enough to build on.

My question, asked in the utmost innocence- Are you still building on that evidence, or have you in all reality given up investigating this case and sitting back waiting for “someone to crack?”?

Have a good day!

Duke

A Final Tipping Point

When will the Stacey Burns murder reach a final tipping point?

On Saturday, we officially launched my new book, The Final Tipping Point. As I was once again perusing my murder book with material I’ve gathered on the Stacey Burns case, I thought about the central theme of the book and its relationship to that case.

Most human beings come to times in their lives when crucial decisions are made, sending them in certain directions. This happens to characters in the book. Call them whatever you might–watershed moments, turning points, or maybe tipping points. I’m wondering when a crucial… Continue reading

85%

Just wondering if the new crime will result in an 85 % chance of conviction . . .

However, we all know that 85 % is not good enough odds to bring forth the case, correct?

Duke

July 27, 2010 and August 13, 2011

Several people expressed interest in the historical perspective presented by revisiting past emails, blog posts, and other materials contained in my “murder book” about the Stacey Burns murder. I’ll share some of them in the interest of trying to make some sense of the timeline for the investigation. I will not refer to anyone by name.

From an email dated July 27, 2010 after visits and interviews by the producers of the 20/20 show in Wolfeboro: “Learned a few things…they found sixty different DNA samples in Stacey’s house.” Another specific detail gleaned from the 20/20 team was shared in this… Continue reading

More from “Murder in a Small Town . . .”

In preparation for a possible conversation with a television reporter (which hasn’t happened yet but may fairly soon), I spent an hour or so leafing through what I call my personal “murder book,” a term used widely by real detectives. It is a compilation of every scrap of paper generated by my research into the Stacey Burns murder. It includes interview notes and transcriptions, hard copies of e-mails, contact documentations, permission to use information forms, and newspaper clippings and articles. It is about two inches thick with hundreds of pages of material.

I’m beginning to think that since the police… Continue reading

Messed up?

I will confess to finding it hard to come up with a new way to say this but here it goes and let the (cliché) chips fall where they may.

Two murders, committed about twelve miles apart (across the big lake) almost ten years ago remain unsolved. Bobbie Miller and Stacey Burns lay in their graves while their killers are free. These are “small town” killings.

Criticize my posts all you want, but what is going on? The New Hampshire State Police Major Crime Unit cannot come up with enough evidence to arrest someone for either crime after all these… Continue reading

My Tips

As I contemplate why only one person has responded to my request for knowledge of people interviewed during the tenth year of the Stacey Burns murder investigation, I began thinking about the “tips’ about the murder that have come my way as a result of my blog and my visits to New Hampshire.

I’ve been told, and I understand the concept, that police are under no obligation to inform someone who submits a tip or possibly relevant information of the results of the investigation of that tip. So, with that in mind, I still think I’m allowed to wonder about… Continue reading

Twelve Days

After waiting twelve days for responses to my last post, I decided that I should let you know the results of my request.

That post, read by dozens of people, resulted in two responses. Both can be read on my website under the category of “Murder in a Small Town.”

One was from a person who has followed this blog and posted responses on a regular basis but is not one who has been close to the murder case of Stacey Burns. The other is a regular contributor here and has been clearly involved in the case since the first… Continue reading

Interviews and followups(From March, 2013)

Five and half years ago, (March 28, 2013) back when I believed that the murderer of Stacey Burns would be caught, I asked this question in a blog post. 

It makes sense, to me at least, to ask the question again since it seems a valid one, even after over five years. So, here it is.

“How many of you out there who were initially interviewed by the police have been reinterviewed within the last six months? (By anyone, including cold case detectives, other state police personnel, local police, reporters) It just seems that the answer to this… Continue reading

I'm Duke Southard, author, educator, and lecturer.

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