Duke Southard

Author, Educator, Lecturer

Murder In a Small Town

This blog deals specifically with my work on the book, Murder in a Small Town: The Tragic Death of Stacey Burns.

My Tips

As I contemplate why only one person has responded to my request for knowledge of people interviewed during the tenth year of the Stacey Burns murder investigation, I began thinking about the “tips’ about the murder that have come my way as a result of my blog and my visits to New Hampshire.

I’ve been told, and I understand the concept, that police are under no obligation to inform someone who submits a tip or possibly relevant information of the results of the investigation of that tip. So, with that in mind, I still think I’m allowed to wonder about… Continue reading

Twelve Days

After waiting twelve days for responses to my last post, I decided that I should let you know the results of my request.

That post, read by dozens of people, resulted in two responses. Both can be read on my website under the category of “Murder in a Small Town.”

One was from a person who has followed this blog and posted responses on a regular basis but is not one who has been close to the murder case of Stacey Burns. The other is a regular contributor here and has been clearly involved in the case since the first… Continue reading

Interviews and followups(From March, 2013)

Five and half years ago, (March 28, 2013) back when I believed that the murderer of Stacey Burns would be caught, I asked this question in a blog post. 

It makes sense, to me at least, to ask the question again since it seems a valid one, even after over five years. So, here it is.

“How many of you out there who were initially interviewed by the police have been reinterviewed within the last six months? (By anyone, including cold case detectives, other state police personnel, local police, reporters) It just seems that the answer to this… Continue reading

When Truth Isn’t The Truth

To my readers:  Apologies for the brief hiatus- Wonderful time with grandchildren intervened. . . .

Here’s a quote from my draft version of Murder in a Small Town: The  Tragic Death of Stacey Burns.”

As absurd as it may be, the fact is that the truth of what happened during Stacey Burns’s final thirty-six hours is elusive. . . .(Unnamed source) captured the ongoing dilemma of trying to sort out the truth when she said that she only knows her truth, admitting that others no doubt have their own version of the truth.”

I remembered this… Continue reading

And Speaking of Revisiting . . .

Given the recent development with Ed Burns in Massachusetts, I’m wondering if  it may be time for the detectives in New Hampshire who have been actively investigating the Stacey Burns murder case to revisit everything about Mr. Burns’ alibi.

Wouldn’t it seem prudent to do so from the start (Michael Brabant’s information, hotel cameras, etc.) to finish? Of course, we can be certain that all of this has been reexamined many times over the last nine years, but why not try again since it seems that Mr. Burns may have a penchant for violence.

Luckily, the public has been… Continue reading

Waning Interest?

As I look back at my history of posts about the murder of Stacey Burns, I’m finding a definite pattern in the number of people reading them, and a similar pattern  in the number of comments.

I am hoping and praying that this pattern is the fault of my posts and not the interest in this case. Speaking frankly (and why would I not?) I will admit that it is difficult to say much that is original about this case any more, thus the “revisits” I’ve been posting.

So, is it the natural human tendency to move on, to… Continue reading

Talented Detective?

Lisa Gardner, one of my favorite crime storytellers, has this line in her short novel, The Fourth Man.

“It’s amazing what you can discover, even in a cold case, with a talented detective.” It is a quote about the redoubtable detective, D.D. Warren.

This leads to my oft-stated question regarding the Stacey Burns murder. Whether it is officially a cold case, or what some in the official world are calling “open, unsolved” my question is simple. Is it still being worked, and if so, with what level of intensity? Now, inspired by Lisa Gardner, we could add another question. Do… Continue reading

“Waiting for him to crack”

In a follow-up story to an original article about my attempts to write a book  about the Stacey Burns murder in Wolfeboro, New Hampshire in 2009, the editor of the Green Valley News says this.

“Southard and I have shared theories on the murder, especially after a New Hampshire cold case detective told me in 2013 that they know who did it–they’re just waiting for him to crack. We both think the case will be solved and somebody will go to prison. But, like any good mystery where the ending’s still up for grabs, we don’t agree on who… Continue reading

Revisiting Frustrations

What fun it is to read through past blog posts I’ve written on the Stacey Burns murder case. I ran across one from October, 2013 which listed some of my frustrations with the case. This entry was inspired by a question I was asked at a program I presented in New Hampshire. Again, note that it was written almost five years ago.

“Frustration # 2 is simply the fact that 1604 days have passed and the authorities continue to less than forthcoming with information. The public continues to be left to ponder why there has not been an… Continue reading

Another Repost re: The Murder of Stacey Burns

Here is a part of another post from January, 2013, about thirty months after I started working on Murder in A Small Town. It seems as pertinent today as it did then, if not more so.

“Recently, I was rereading an Ann Rule book of true crime cases (A Rage to Kill) and ran across the phrase, “Closed-Exceptional,” in her foreword. It is a phrase I did not recall but she says it designates a case in which the guilty person is known by detectives but, due to lack of physical evidence, has never been arrested. Obviously, with… Continue reading

I'm Duke Southard, author, educator, and lecturer.

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